• Master of Social Work

     

    The central mission of the School of Social Work at Monmouth University is to prepare its graduates for professional practice with a commitment to improving the quality of life of vulnerable individuals, families, groups, and communities on the local, national, and international levels.

    This is accomplished by enabling our graduates to articulate and implement a practice paradigm that emerges from a commitment to human rights, social and economic justice, and individual and collective empowerment. Graduates are expected to develop their understanding, analysis, and evaluation of human experiences and societies in the past and in the contemporary world, and of individuals and families of varied cultural and social contexts. These conceptualizations explicitly build on the liberal arts tradition.

    The educational focus of the school is to prepare social work practitioners with a commitment to excellence and to the knowledge, skills, goals, values, and ethics of the social work profession. The curriculum supports this primary goal through three themes: a strengths perspective; an empowerment approach; and conceptualizing families within a global context.

    The primary mission of the MSW Program at Monmouth University is to prepare graduates for advanced social work practice. The MSW Program currently offers two tracks, one in practice with families and children, and the second in international and community development practice.

    As a school within a regional university we are also committed to engaging students, alumni, and the social work community of New Jersey in the endeavor of continuous learning. This professional commitment to learning includes the production and application of research and scholarship to influence social policies and the direction of social work services.

    Program Goals

    The goals for student learning and program impact are designed to enable graduates to articulate a practice paradigm that emerges from a commitment to human rights, social and economic justice, and individual and collective empowerment as articulated in the program's mission statement. The following goals are rendered from this guiding departmental commitment:



    1. To develop an understanding, analysis, and evaluation of human experiences and societies in the past and in the contemporary world.
    2. To understand, analyze, and evaluate individuals and families of varied cultural and social contexts.
    3. To understand, analyze, evaluate, and contribute to social work theory, knowledge, values, and skills through three interrelated themes: the strengths perspective, an empowerment approach, and understanding families within a global context.
    4. To prepare social work practitioners who develop and systematically apply knowledge, values, skills, and ethics in the prevention and/or solution of social problems impacting individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities in a variety of cultural contexts.
    5. To think critically, to analyze, and to produce and disseminate research that informs theory, policy, practice, and evaluation in social work.
    6. To collaborate with and support the surrounding community through volunteerism, service, education, and consultation.

    The program's rationale, its mission, goals, and objectives each are progressively more specific articulations of the three interrelated themes that weave throughout the curriculum. Those themes are the strengths perspective, an empowerment approach, and understanding families within a global context.

    The strengths perspective demands a different way of perceiving the beneficiaries of social work. It is an embodiment of social work efforts to tap into recognized capacities and assets of individuals, families, organizations, communities, nations, and the international community. All must be seen in the light of their talents, competencies, possibilities, visions, values, and hopes, however dashed and distorted these may have become though circumstances, oppression, and trauma.

    Empowerment is the process of increasing personal, interpersonal, or political power so that individuals, families, and communities can take action to improve their situations. The purposes of empowerment include preserving and restoring human dignity, benefiting from and celebrating the diversities of humanity, and transforming self and society into one that welcomes and supports the voices, the potential, the ways of knowing, and the energies of us all. Empowerment involves redistributing resources so that the voices and visions of persons previously excluded from resources, knowledge, decisions and power are included. It is the process through which people gain the power and resources necessary to shape our world and reach our full human potential.

    Understanding families within a global context recognizes that at this juncture in history, family lives are no longer defined solely by the local environments in which we live. The international global system is increasingly replacing the local community as the basis for social identity. Our global perspective on family practice seeks to reveal how events in one part of the world affect what happens in other locals and to the families within those locals.

    Field Practicum

    Field work is at the core of social work education. It's a rewarding and challenging experience that will prepare you for the start of your professional career in social work. It is also a major commitment and usually generates the most questions. The Office of Field and Professional Education has assembled the most frequently asked questions, along with their respective answers, into a single factsheet.


    View the MSW Field Frequently Asked Questions.


    Visit Monmouth University's Office of Admission.

    For more information on the MSW program, see the graduate student handbook or contact Dr. Rosemary Barbera, MSW Director, at rbarbera@monmouth.edu.

     

    Additional Information